Post-treatment consists of preparing the water for distribution after filtration. Reverse osmosis is an effective barrier to pathogens, but post-treatment provides secondary protection against compromised membranes and downstream problems. Disinfection by means of ultraviolet (UV) lamps (sometimes called germicidal or bactericidal) may be employed to sterilize pathogens which bypassed the reverse-osmosis process. Chlorination or chloramination (chlorine and ammonia) protects against pathogens which may have lodged in the distribution system downstream, such as from new construction, backwash, compromised pipes, etc.[24]

Filter out pathogens with pine trees. Certain plants are effective at removing pathogens from water, and pine trees are among the best. To remove viruses and bacteria from your water, remove a small branch from a pine tree. Strip the bark from the stick and place the bare stick into a bucket. Slowly pour the water, letting it trickle onto the stick and into the bucket.[10]
The booster pump included with this tankless reverse osmosis system requires electricity but helps to maximize the efficiency of the system. It can achieve up to a 1:1 ratio of purified to wastewater. However, in real-world use, some people found that wastewater was more like 2 gallons for every 1 gallon of purified water produced. iSprings points out that many factors affect this efficiency rating, so some variance in results is to be expected.

Many reef aquarium keepers use reverse osmosis systems for their artificial mixture of seawater. Ordinary tap water can contain excessive chlorine, chloramines, copper, nitrates, nitrites, phosphates, silicates, or many other chemicals detrimental to the sensitive organisms in a reef environment. Contaminants such as nitrogen compounds and phosphates can lead to excessive and unwanted algae growth. An effective combination of both reverse osmosis and deionization is the most popular among reef aquarium keepers, and is preferred above other water purification processes due to the low cost of ownership and minimal operating costs. Where chlorine and chloramines are found in the water, carbon filtration is needed before the membrane, as the common residential membrane used by reef keepers does not cope with these compounds.


"The overall study results revealed that the CHLOR-FLOC system was not adequate to physically remove, or to provide adequate chemical disinfection of, Cryptosporidium oocysts to the required level of 99.9 percent reduction. Water, Purification, CHLOR-FLOC tablets, Micro-organisms, Cryptosporidium, Klebseilla, Echovirus, Latex beads, Protozoan cysts, Bacteria, Disinfection, Coagulation." Source: oai.dtic.mil
This is my second RO-PH90 system. Simply one of the best systems on the market, in my opinion. Uses genuine Dow filmtec reverse osmosis membrane. As anyone familiar with RO knows, filmtec membranes are the gold standard and rank among the elite in rejection rates. This is not your generic RO bought in a hardware store, although some large chains carry it. Input TDS = ~225 ppm, output TDS = ~15-20ppm. Does the job. Have not tested PH yet. Water tastes great as it does with my first system. Change your pre filters once per year or at the recommended %TDS interval and expect this RO membrane to last its full schedule of 3-5 years. This is very important. Incoming water pressure must be at least 50psi in my opinion, for this system to operate as intended. At 75psi, outgoing pressure is like a dream, even with 1/4'' stock tubing. ... full review
Reverse osmosis differs from filtration in that the mechanism of fluid flow is by osmosis across a membrane. The predominant removal mechanism in membrane filtration is straining, or size exclusion, where the pores are 0.01 micrometers or larger, so the process can theoretically achieve perfect efficiency regardless of parameters such as the solution's pressure and concentration. Reverse osmosis instead involves solvent diffusion across a membrane that is either nonporous or uses nanofiltration with pores 0.001 micrometers in size. The predominant removal mechanism is from differences in solubility or diffusivity, and the process is dependent on pressure, solute concentration, and other conditions.[2] Reverse osmosis is most commonly known for its use in drinking water purification from seawater, removing the salt and other effluent materials from the water molecules.[3]
Household reverse-osmosis units use a lot of water because they have low back pressure. As a result, they recover only 5 to 15% of the water entering the system. The remainder is discharged as waste water. Because waste water carries with it the rejected contaminants, methods to recover this water are not practical for household systems. Wastewater is typically connected to the house drains and will add to the load on the household septic system. A reverse-osmosis unit delivering 19 L of treated water per day may discharge between 75–340 L of waste water daily.[25] This has a disastrous consequence for mega cities like Delhi where large-scale use of household R.O. devices has increased the total water demand of the already water parched National Capital Territory of India.[26]
Photo by marcos ojedaPrepackaged meals are the perfect camping food – lightweight, convenient, and easy to prepare. While many prepackaged meals are commercially available, you can save money, get the types of meals you want, and have fun by making your own. Fill a small freezer bag with ½ cup quick-cooking oats, a tablespoon of dry milk, a teaspoon of sugar, and a handful of dried fruit and nuts for a nutritious breakfast. For lunch, try a third of a cup of dry couscous, ½ cup freeze dried vegetables, a tablespoon of shelf stable shredded Parmesan cheese, a teaspoon of vegetable bullion and a few seasonings. How about rice with beef and mushrooms for dinner? And let’s not forget about desert; how does a mixed up fruit cobbler sound?
People love the quick, easy operation of the Zip Reverse Osmosis Water Filter and the fact that they don’t have to install anything or run hoses to the tap. The convenience of a reverse osmosis system for apartments doesn’t come cheap though. Still, this is one of the sleekest, most portable reverse osmosis systems we’ve seen. Whether you’re a renter or looking for a mobile water filtration system, the Zip is a great choice.
Furthermore, animals have to drink and are known to visit water holes. This raises several concerns, 1) Animals are not very mindful of their toilet etiquette and 2) Predators will sometimes use water holes as a place of attack. If we were desperate, (dying of thirst) and had no way to purify the water, first we really should ask ourselves how we got ourselves into such a situation, then we would have no choice but to drink the water in hopes that we are rescued before the water borne disease kills us. Think outside the box, is there a way to get a makeshift bowl (wood, vegetation) and use hot rocks to boil the water. Is there any material around, bamboo etc that can be used to slowly bring the water to a boil. Build a multiple stage filter using sand, charcoal and sphagnum moss which has been known to contain some levels of iodine. If all that fails then we would be faced with the choice of drinking the untreated water. We know that moving water is preferable to standing water, but what can we do. We can walk around the water source, find the area with the least animal traffic and preferably a sandy shoreline. We can then dig a hole near the water deep enough to allow water to collect. The distance from the water source will have to be judged by the soil we are digging. The hope here is that the water will slowly seep into the hole and begin to collect while being "filtered" by the sand and rocks. At this point we have to get creative to get the water out. Perhaps make a straw out of natural materials or simply soak a bandana and squeeze it into our mouth. This would be a last resort and very risky.
The first part of the purification tag team must eliminate microorganisms, like harmful bacteria and parasites. There are a handful of tried and true methods for doing this. The most familiar is boiling. Simply bringing water up to its boiling point of 212 degrees Fahrenheit will kill almost all microorganisms, so just a few minutes of boiling will do the job.
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