The most common disinfection method involves some form of chlorine or its compounds such as chloramine or chlorine dioxide. Chlorine is a strong oxidant that rapidly kills many harmful micro-organisms. Because chlorine is a toxic gas, there is a danger of a release associated with its use. This problem is avoided by the use of sodium hypochlorite, which is a relatively inexpensive solution used in household bleach that releases free chlorine when dissolved in water. Chlorine solutions can be generated on site by electrolyzing common salt solutions. A solid form, calcium hypochlorite, releases chlorine on contact with water. Handling the solid, however, requires more routine human contact through opening bags and pouring than the use of gas cylinders or bleach, which are more easily automated. The generation of liquid sodium hypochlorite is inexpensive and also safer than the use of gas or solid chlorine. Chlorine levels up to 4 milligrams per liter (4 parts per million) are considered safe in drinking water.[12]
Plumbosolvency reduction: In areas with naturally acidic waters of low conductivity (i.e. surface rainfall in upland mountains of igneous rocks), the water may be capable of dissolving lead from any lead pipes that it is carried in. The addition of small quantities of phosphate ion and increasing the pH slightly both assist in greatly reducing plumbo-solvency by creating insoluble lead salts on the inner surfaces of the pipes.
Strain the water. For water that’s contaminated with large particles like pebbles, insects, plant matter, or dirt, you can strain out the contaminants.[1] Line a fine-mesh strainer with muslin, cheesecloth, a clean dish towel, or even a clean cotton shirt. Place the strainer over a bowl, and pour the water through the strainer to remove the particles.
The water from this unit is pretty much tasteless to me, which is ideal since tap water tastes awful. I grew up with Culligan, which has a certain taste to me, versus this which is just pure. Haven't tested it but plan to. We also added a line to the fridge ice maker so our ice is purified. It was easy to install in our home, and we've used it three months with no issues. The cables are long. today when our sink clogged and we had to drain it, got a mess over all the filters, and they water tubes were all long enough to put the whole unit (still assembled and attached), into the sink to rinse it off. I'm glad it's made in the USA so I know all the parts have stringent manufacturing guidelines. The only thing I would change, is ordering directly from apec instead ... full review 

The addition of inorganic coagulants such as aluminum sulfate (or alum) or iron (III) salts such as iron(III) chloride cause several simultaneous chemical and physical interactions on and among the particles. Within seconds, negative charges on the particles are neutralized by inorganic coagulants. Also within seconds, metal hydroxide precipitates of the iron and aluminium ions begin to form. These precipitates combine into larger particles under natural processes such as Brownian motion and through induced mixing which is sometimes referred to as flocculation. Amorphous metal hydroxides are known as "floc". Large, amorphous aluminum and iron (III) hydroxides adsorb and enmesh particles in suspension and facilitate the removal of particles by subsequent processes of sedimentation and filtration.[6]:8.2–8.3
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