Energy-recovery pump: a reciprocating piston pump having the pressurized concentrate flow applied to one side of each piston to help drive the membrane feed flow from the opposite side. These are the simplest energy recovery devices to apply, combining the high pressure pump and energy recovery in a single self-regulating unit. These are widely used on smaller low-energy systems. They are capable of 3 kWh/m3 or less energy consumption.
Found on small or moderate-size streams and rivers, low-head dams are used to regulate water flow or prevent invasive species from swimming upstream. But watch out. "They're called drowning machines because they could not be designed better to drown people," says Kevin Colburn of American Whitewater, a nonprofit whitewater preservation group. To a boater heading downstream, the dams look like a single line of flat reflective water. But water rushing over the dam creates a spinning cylinder of water that can trap a capsized boater.
Plumbosolvency reduction: In areas with naturally acidic waters of low conductivity (i.e. surface rainfall in upland mountains of igneous rocks), the water may be capable of dissolving lead from any lead pipes that it is carried in. The addition of small quantities of phosphate ion and increasing the pH slightly both assist in greatly reducing plumbo-solvency by creating insoluble lead salts on the inner surfaces of the pipes.
Chlorine is effective against bacteria and most viruses. Norovirus, an intestinal disease that causes diarrhea, is particularly resistant to chlorine and will require the water to sit twice as long instead of the standard 30 minutes before consumption. Giardia, a parasite with a protective coating, will survive in chlorine treated water for 45 minutes before its safe to drink.
Filter out pathogens with pine trees. Certain plants are effective at removing pathogens from water, and pine trees are among the best. To remove viruses and bacteria from your water, remove a small branch from a pine tree. Strip the bark from the stick and place the bare stick into a bucket. Slowly pour the water, letting it trickle onto the stick and into the bucket.[10]
The most common disinfection method involves some form of chlorine or its compounds such as chloramine or chlorine dioxide. Chlorine is a strong oxidant that rapidly kills many harmful micro-organisms. Because chlorine is a toxic gas, there is a danger of a release associated with its use. This problem is avoided by the use of sodium hypochlorite, which is a relatively inexpensive solution used in household bleach that releases free chlorine when dissolved in water. Chlorine solutions can be generated on site by electrolyzing common salt solutions. A solid form, calcium hypochlorite, releases chlorine on contact with water. Handling the solid, however, requires more routine human contact through opening bags and pouring than the use of gas cylinders or bleach, which are more easily automated. The generation of liquid sodium hypochlorite is inexpensive and also safer than the use of gas or solid chlorine. Chlorine levels up to 4 milligrams per liter (4 parts per million) are considered safe in drinking water.[12]
Remineralization stage adds back some beneficial minerals such as magnesium, calcium, and potassium to the purified water. This process is introduced to overcome the problem of acidic water. This addition of minerals gives the taste back to the water, which is removed in final filters. Remineralization enhanced the experience of purified water but it also makes the water more alkaline and less acidic.
There are multiple levels of filtration. As long as the water has been purified properly, filtration at this point would mostly be to make the water more attractive. Since most of us are not used to, drinking water with, leaves, algae, dirt, etcetera. So, at least a minimal amount of filtration is recommended. Since, while you can ingest/digest the aforementioned, most of us would prefer not to.
A Solar Still is a device that can be constructed in order to distill contaminated water into drinking water, or to pull condensation from damp resources in order to produce enough water for consumption. Solar stills can be a life-saving device if stranded in the desert without water or if lost at sea. This simple device uses the sun to evaporate contaminated water from a collection basin and collect the condensation in another basin. The condensation is essentially distilled and drinkable. It can be done with saltwater and can even be constructed to pull moisture from the ground if water isn't available at all. Solar stills can either be constructed out of simple materials or purchased and used for emergency. To learn how to make a solar still in a survival situation or to purchase one in case of emergency, read our detailed article about solar stills here.
Despite its efficiency in killing microorganisms, UV radiation will not remove heavy metals and particles. Something else to consider is the high maintenance requirement for a UV purification system. Frequent cleaning and proper part replacement are necessary requirements in maintaining a properly functioning system. Read our article on UV water purification systems for home to find out more.
Many reef aquarium keepers use reverse osmosis systems for their artificial mixture of seawater. Ordinary tap water can contain excessive chlorine, chloramines, copper, nitrates, nitrites, phosphates, silicates, or many other chemicals detrimental to the sensitive organisms in a reef environment. Contaminants such as nitrogen compounds and phosphates can lead to excessive and unwanted algae growth. An effective combination of both reverse osmosis and deionization is the most popular among reef aquarium keepers, and is preferred above other water purification processes due to the low cost of ownership and minimal operating costs. Where chlorine and chloramines are found in the water, carbon filtration is needed before the membrane, as the common residential membrane used by reef keepers does not cope with these compounds.
Installation went very well, although the manual was generic and not specific to the model I bought. This made the assembly a little longer as there were no specific photos pertaining to the 7 stage unit. Unit comes 95% assembled and all fittings installed. All interconnecting tubing is precut and most is preassembled. The included universal adapter fittings for your plumbing made drain hookup a snap. Total install under the sink took about 3 hours (drilling, electric, etc.). Don't forget the electric outlet! Zero leaks after install. As the instructions say, the first few cups of water will come out quite warm because water surrounds the ultraviolet sterilizer bulb and it is always on. Great for tea or coffee, less microwave time. Let it run for 10 seconds and you're good. I am getting about 2.5 gallons out of the unit before pressure drops. It still puts out after that, ... full review

Direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD). Applicable to desalination. Heated seawater is passed along the surface of a hydrophobic polymer membrane. Evaporated water passes from the hot side through pores in the membrane into a stream of cold pure water on the other side. The difference in vapour pressure between the hot and cold side helps to push water molecules through.

Each branch of the United States armed forces has their own series of reverse osmosis water purification unit models, but they are all similar. The water is pumped from its raw source into the reverse osmosis water purification unit module, where it is treated with a polymer to initiate coagulation. Next, it is run through a multi-media filter where it undergoes primary treatment by removing turbidity. It is then pumped through a cartridge filter which is usually spiral-wound cotton. This process clarifies the water of any particles larger than 5 µm and eliminates almost all turbidity.


Permanent water chlorination began in 1905, when a faulty slow sand filter and a contaminated water supply led to a serious typhoid fever epidemic in Lincoln, England.[44] Dr. Alexander Cruickshank Houston used chlorination of the water to stem the epidemic. His installation fed a concentrated solution of chloride of lime to the water being treated. The chlorination of the water supply helped stop the epidemic and as a precaution, the chlorination was continued until 1911 when a new water supply was instituted.[45]
While nearly everyone loves the taste from this water filtration system, a few people tested the pH and complained that it wasn’t as alkaline as they hoped for in a system that adds back beneficial minerals. However, the company points out that the pH filter will raise acidity by 1-1.5 levels, so the final pH will depend on the chemistry of the water that you’re starting with. 
U.S. Army Major Carl Rogers Darnall, Professor of Chemistry at the Army Medical School, gave the first practical demonstration of this in 1910. Shortly thereafter, Major William J. L. Lyster of the Army Medical Department used a solution of calcium hypochlorite in a linen bag to treat water. For many decades, Lyster's method remained the standard for U.S. ground forces in the field and in camps, implemented in the form of the familiar Lyster Bag (also spelled Lister Bag). This work became the basis for present day systems of municipal water purification.
U.S. Army Major Carl Rogers Darnall, Professor of Chemistry at the Army Medical School, gave the first practical demonstration of this in 1910. Shortly thereafter, Major William J. L. Lyster of the Army Medical Department used a solution of calcium hypochlorite in a linen bag to treat water. For many decades, Lyster's method remained the standard for U.S. ground forces in the field and in camps, implemented in the form of the familiar Lyster Bag (also spelled Lister Bag). This work became the basis for present day systems of municipal water purification.
Radium Removal: Some groundwater sources contain radium, a radioactive chemical element. Typical sources include many groundwater sources north of the Illinois River in Illinois, United States of America. Radium can be removed by ion exchange, or by water conditioning. The back flush or sludge that is produced is, however, a low-level radioactive waste.
The other options involve chemical agents. Hikers have long been familiar with using iodine tablets to kill microorganisms in local water sources. A typical example would be a tiny pellet being good for a quart of water. Bleach has been popular in poorer countries for decades as a means of killing microorganisms in local tap water, and works just as well with other sources. Eight drops per gallon will make the water safe to drink. Both methods should be allowed half an hour to do their job.
One way to disinfect water through solar purification is through the use of plastic bottles and sunlight. Remove all labels and paper from the bottles and ensure they have no scratches. Fill them with water to about three quarters full, shake for a half-minute to activate the oxygen, fill with water to the brim, cover, and then lay it horizontally and expose to direct sunlight (Water Benefits Health).
A nice feature of the Sawyer system is the benefit of using the same filter as a water treatment bottle, inline on a hydration pack, as an ultra light drink straw and attached to a faucet with the included faucet adaptor. If purchased with the faucet adaptor kit, it can be configured to drink straight from the tap during boil alerts or in areas of natural disasters such as floods, hurricanes, and earthquakes. The kit also provides hydration pack assembly kit for installing the inline filter on a hydration pack.
Photo by Steven DepoloBandanas take up little or no space, have multiple uses, and can even be worn as jewelry. As a medical supply, use it as a tourniquet, wound dressing, smoke mask, or sling. Use bandanas to wrap around and protect delicate items such as electronics and sunglasses. Use one to wash with or to wash dishes with, to pre-filter water or as a napkin. Protect your head from the sun, make a sweatband, or tie back your hair. If you become lost or disoriented, a brightly colored bandana makes an easy-to-spot signal flag; tear strips to mark your trail.
In 1904, Allen Hazen showed that the efficiency of a sedimentation process was a function of the particle settling velocity, the flow through the tank and the surface area of tank. Sedimentation tanks are typically designed within a range of overflow rates of 0.5 to 1.0 gallons per minute per square foot (or 1.25 to 2.5 litres per square meter per hour). In general, sedimentation basin efficiency is not a function of detention time or depth of the basin. Although, basin depth must be sufficient so that water currents do not disturb the sludge and settled particle interactions are promoted. As particle concentrations in the settled water increase near the sludge surface on the bottom of the tank, settling velocities can increase due to collisions and agglomeration of particles. Typical detention times for sedimentation vary from 1.5 to 4 hours and basin depths vary from 10 to 15 feet (3 to 4.5 meters).[6]:9.39–9.40[7]:790–1[8]:140–2, 171
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